escuyer:

Honda CB550 Cafe Racer 

(via tokyo-bleep)

wonderful-strange:

jthenr-comics-vault:

DETECTIVE COMICS #33 (Nov.1939)
Art by Bob Kane
Words by Bill Finger

wonderful-strange:

Bernie Wrightson, panel from “The Muck Monster,” 1975.

red-lipstick:

Michael Barnes (b. 1969, MI, USA) - Sacrificial Dilemma from Dark Lands series, 2010     Lithograph

Lol

Lol

(via andafern)

(via andafern)

kqedscience:

Scientists Uncover a Surprising World of Microbes in Cheese Rind

The rind of good cheese is a thriving microbial community. A single gram—a tiny crumb—contains 10 billion microbial cells, a mix of bacteria and fungi thatcontribute delicious and sometimes funky flavors. But even though humans have been making cheese for thousands of years, we know very little about what all those bugs are and how they interact.

Benjamin Wolfe and Rachel Dutton want to change that. The two scientists recently brought 137 cheeses from 10 countries into Dutton’s lab at Harvard University for genetic analysis. In a paper published July 17 in Cell, they and colleagues describe their findings, which include a few surprises—like the presence of bacteria commonly found in marine environments on cheeses made nowhere near an ocean.”

Learn more from wired.

Kiiinda funky

230pm:

One more month!

(via annaissmiles)

2headedsnake:

Can Buyukberber

2headedsnake:

Sophie Roach

ohstarstuff:

Cassini Spacecraft Reveals 101 Geysers and More on Icy Saturn Moon

Scientists using mission data from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft have identified 101 distinct geysers erupting on Saturn’s icy moon Enceladus. Their analysis suggests it is possible for liquid water to reach from the moon’s underground sea all the way to its surface.

Over a period of almost seven years, Cassini’s cameras surveyed the south polar terrain of the small moon, a unique geological basin renowned for its four prominent “tiger stripe” fractures and the geysers of tiny icy particles and water vapor first sighted there nearly 10 years ago. The result of the survey is a map of 101 geysers, each erupting from one of the tiger stripe fractures, and the discovery that individual geysers are coincident with small hot spots. These relationships pointed the way to the geysers’ origin.

Thanks to recent analysis of Cassini gravity data, the researchers concluded the only plausible source of the material forming the geysers is the sea now known to exist beneath the ice shell. They also found that narrow pathways through the ice shell can remain open from the sea all the way to the surface, if filled with liquid water.

The fact that Enceladus’ sea is salty, laced with organic compounds, spouting into space, and maybe even rising up to the surface has raised this particular Saturnian moon as a major target for future exploration.


Cross-section of Ice Shell (Artist rendering)

Credit: NASA JPL

(via scinerds)

kqedscience:

Noctilucent Clouds … Frooooom Spaaaaaace!

"I recently wrote an article talking about noctilucent clouds—relatively rare high-altitude clouds usually seen just after sunset and before sunrise. They have a milky, silvery appearance, and are usually pretty hard to capture on photos.

It can be even harder from space, where lighting conditions are harsher and getting the right exposure balance is difficult. But astronaut Reid Wiseman got it just right recently, snagging a photo of the odd clouds from the International Space Station.”

Find out more from astronomer Phil Plait.